Vista Verde Ranch, Luxury Guest Ranch
Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch
Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch"
Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch
Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch
Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch
Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch

Archive for June, 2014

Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch

Foxnews.com – June 2014

Date: June 23rd, 2014

American’s Most Family Friendly Resorts- Foxnews.com, June 23, 2014

Planning a getaway that the whole family will love?

Young kids want to play, teens want to hang, and parents probably just want to relax. But these top U.S. destinations have something for everyone. From awesome pool to unique activities, kids and adults can keep busy on their own- and once in a while come together as a family.  Read on….

Posted in Vista Verde in the News | Comments (0)

Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch

Winter Vacations at Vista Verde

Date: June 20th, 2014

by Steph

Sleigh ride ColoradoThe other evening, I got to enjoy a wonderful dinner with some of our guests.  The evening was a stitch with the guests firing questions at me, left and right.  They told me at the end that I passed my annual job review, and I could come back to work the next day.  Phew.

But, during the conversation, one question stood out to me (ok, besides the “brilliant” marketing ideas we were passing around such as adding cow tipping, among other things).  The question was, “What would it look like for me to come here with my family during the winter?”  The point of the question was that guest said when he found our website, he saw that we offer winter stays as well.  But, although he could imagine the summer vacation concept he couldn’t really wrap his head around what a winter vacation at Vista Verde would be like for his family.  So, I began to paint the picture.  Here’s how it went.

winter horse back ridingWinter vacations at Vista Verde are magical.  That’s the best word I can use to describe them.  The snow is piled up as high as the fences, which muffles all the noise and looks like a sea of marshmallows.  When it’s a snowy day, flakes fall gently out of the sky- sometimes huge fluffy flakes, sometimes small tiny specks.  On the bluebird sky days, the snow sparkles like a field of diamonds and the sun warms us all as we play outside.

For the romantics, a winter vacation at Vista Verde is like none other.  Ok, no itsy bitsy string bikinis here.  But, imagine a cozy cabin with a fire roaring inside.  The hot tub bubbles on the deck, waiting for you to come out and sit under the stars.  No TV, no phone, no distractions from the one you love.  Reading by the fire, chatting in the hot tub….it’s up to you.

kids sledding on their winter vacationFor families, I firmly believe there is no better place to introduce kids to snow.  Unlike the big ski resorts, there are no lines here.  No crowds.  No hassle of renting gear, figuring out ski schools, finding your kids, hauling your wet and tired kid all the way across a mountain to get back to your condo, dealing with the neighbors who are staying up all night partying.  Out here it’s quiet, quaint and comfortable.  Kids can experience all sorts of different snow based activities.  If they get cold, it’s just a hop over to the cabin to change clothes and warm up.  Someone is always looking out for them with our small community atmosphere.  It’s easy, safe and fun.  And every kid needs to experience the joy of snow at least once while they are still young enough to want to make snow angels.

All inclusive resort ColoradoWhat do you do?  Are there enough activities?  Well, give back country skiing a try, or take a skate ski lesson.  If that seems like too much technique (it’s not, we promise even a total novice can do it) then let our guides take you out on a back country snowshoe.  Ride a horse in the snow.  Take a horsemanship clinic in the heated indoor arena.  Go for a sleigh ride.  We have the one horse open sleigh….it doesn’t get any more classic than that.  Help us feed our herd of horses the old fashioned way on the big sleigh pulled by the draft horse team.  Step inside for a wine tasting or a cooking class.  Stretch out with some yoga.  Learn the finer points of using your camera in our photography workshop.  Tube!  We’ll pull you up the hill with snowmobiles and then you can fly back down on a big, cushy snow tube.  If that’s not enough, head into Steamboat for dogsledding or snow mobiling, or even downhill skiing.  Trust us, there is plenty to do in between those amazing meals.

If you’ve ever wanted to experience a classic winter resort, it’s time to try Vista Verde Ranch in the winter!  As much as I’m loving the summer season right now, thinking about winter gets me excited to bundle up and go out to play in the snow.  Soon enough we’ll be enjoying the winter wonderland again.

 

 

 

Posted in This week at the Ranch | Comments (0)

Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch

Where’s Willie?

Date: June 10th, 2014

By Steph

There’s a little game we play with the kids who come to Vista Verde Ranch.  It involves a moose name Willie and some bedtime snacks.  You see, each evening the housekeeping fairies visit the cabins and leave a little something for mom and dad, along with a snack for the kids.  The snack is guarded by Willie the Moose.  However, most nights Willie gets a little sneaky and hides with the snack.  All good and fun, right?

Willie the dude ranch mooseWell, not always.  Yesterday, housekeeping fairy Emily was stumped when she came by to clean up one of the cabins in the morning.  She couldn’t find Willie.  He was missing.  If you’ve been following us for a while, you may be aware of the Willie the Moose book, and may even have your own copy.  If you’ve read the book, you know that Willie is a funny critter so maybe it’s not a surprise that he went hiding. (If you don’t have the book, pardon the shameless plug but you can buy one now!)

If you know housekeeping fairy Emily, you may also know that she is a wee bit vertically challenged, so it’s no surprise that it took her a while to find Willie.  As you can see, he went for a bit of a climb overnight.  But, fear not, he has been rescued and returned to his happy place in the cabin.  However, let us just say it now to Jack and Austin.  Game on.  Good luck finding your snack tonight!

 

Posted in This week at the Ranch | Comments (0)

Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch

All-American food for an All-American Vacation, but with a luxurious twist

Date: June 3rd, 2014

By John, with some input from Steph, and excerpts from product sites

The other day, Chef John showed up in my office beaming with excitement to share a slice of “ham”.  I put that in quotes, because that’s what I thought it was.  After a 5 minute enthusiastic explanation, I realized this isn’t just “ham”.  So, I asked John to give me a little more info on some of the other things like “ham” that he’s excited about in the kitchen for this summer.  As you can see, Chef John does not lack enthusiasm for amazing culinary products (catch him talking fishing and you’ll find this extends to his life as an angler).  Here’s what he has to say about where he and Chef Cholly are taking things this summer:

This season, instead of looking for inspiration from across the world, we decided to look right in our backyard to see what small and specialty producers are doing close to home. The cooking techniques and products that we are using are specific to regions of the states that are known for their unique contributions to the culinary world. Also we are featuring local, organic and heirloom varieties whenever possible, this includes meats and dairy with no antibiotics or growth hormones.  Here is some info on a few of the products we’re excited to be serving our guests at Vista Verde: 

Edward’s family hams in Virginia

Developed as an All-American alternative to Europe’s dry-cured hams, Edwards Surryano Ham is crafted from rare heritage breed hogs. The purebred Berkshires are pasture-raised to create perfectly marbled meat. Hand-cured, hickory-smoked and aged, the unforgettable rich flavor matches and surpasses anything from across the pond.

Hams from S. Wallace Edwards & Sons in Surry, Virginia, are prepared in the true Virginia Tradition.

Long before the first settlers arrived at Jamestown in 1607, the Native Americans had been curing venison and fish, plentiful in forest and rivers.

The taste of the salt-cured and smoked meat was different from the sun-dried method the settlers knew in their native England.

The settlers soon brought hogs which were left to forage New World vegetation including nuts and acorns. By 1608, the colonists were keeping their hogs on an island five miles below the Jamestown settlement. The island soon became known as Hog Island, as it is today over three centuries later. In 1652, Surry County was formed encompassing Hog Island and much other land across the James River from Jamestown.

These early colonists soon developed a process of smoking pork over hickory and oak fires, after rubbing it with salt obtained from evaporating seawater, then allowing the meat to stand for a period of time. The salt preserved the meat, the smoking and aging enhanced the flavor.

When other crops failed or tobacco prices fell, there were always hams to trade; thus, Virginia hams were exported to England from Surry.

For generations, ham curing has been a seasonal event for Virginia farmers. Hogs were killed in the winter and their meat packed in salt while the weather was cool enough to keep it from spoiling. The meat then was rinsed and hung to dry and smoke during the remaining cool months. With luck, it would endure the high temperatures of summer age.

In 1926, S. Wallace Edwards, the young captain of the Jamestown-Surry ferry began selling ham sandwiches to his passengers. The ham had been cured by him as on the family farm according to those time tested methods.

Soon demand became great enough that S. Wallace Edwards began curing hams on a full time basis, distributing them to country stores and fine hotels, and shipping them throughout the country and overseas.

S. Wallace Edwards & Sons remains a family operation in Surry County not far from Jamestown where Native Americans taught the settlers to cure meat. Today’s facilities simulate the seasons without sacrificing the care and attention that result in that unique flavor of Virginia hams.

In the time-honored style of the Native Americans, settlers and farmers before them, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons processes each ham by hand as it goes through the stages of curing.

Many days of cool “hickory” smoked are required to give these hams their rich mahogany color. They are then allowed to hang undisturbed for “aging” until they develop that real Virginia flavor. The very finest hams are selected and hand-rubbed with salt. They remain in the curing room under controlled temperature until the desired amount of salt has been absorbed. Excess salt is removed by washing and the hams are then pepper-coated and ready for hanging in the smokehouse.

Uncooked hams are ready to ship at this point others may go through a cooking process in the ham kitchen. These are submerged in water and slowly simmered until they are fully cooked and ready to be served.

We’re also bringing in heirloom and organic grains and legumes from Anson mills in south Carolina

Anson Mills founder and visionary Glenn Roberts grew up in San Diego, California, the son of a professional singer and photographer, and an erstwhile Southern belle from Edisto, South Carolina who became an accomplished scratch cook and occasional restaurateur. Glenn was a restless, deeply curious boy, who, by all accounts, required steady discipline to stay out of mischief. His mother tried to tame him by putting him to work on weekends as a busboy in her restaurant. His father taught him to fly an Aeronca Champ when he was just eight years old, using pillows to prop him up and two-by-fours wired to the rudder pedals. Both parents required their children to have musical training: Glenn studied French horn throughout his boyhood and adolescence, performing first in the San Diego Youth Symphony, and later occupying fourth chair in the San Diego Symphony. None of this, however, prevented Glenn from pursuing his real passion (and every parent’s nightmare): chemistry experiments. Working with explosive gas for a national science contest, Glenn blew the door off his parents’ garage on one occasion and decimated his mother’s kitchen on another. (The experiments earned him second place in the contest; the damages earned him a whipping.)

At 17, Glenn entered the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a music and science scholarship and graduated four years later. A conventional life track, however, was too narrow to contain his energies: he joined the Air Force to feed his love of supersonic jets and flying and later sailed around the world on private yachts as a navigator and a mate (becoming, in the process, absorbed by indigenous foods of the tropical environment and the agriculture that accompanied them). He took up riding and dressage. He drove long-haul trucks.

Somewhere along the road of diversionary adventure, Glenn’s overarching interests distilled into the study of architectural history and the history of food. Settling down into a suit and proper shoes, he backed into historic property restoration from the kitchen door, working on space design and adaptive reuse in Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. His geographic area ultimately narrowed to South Carolina where Glenn took on broader aspects of redesign projects, carrying those through to the hiring of chefs and marketing staff, and to the planning and execution of celebratory dinners at projects’ end. The menus he helped plan were intended to offer period-authentic dishes. But the ingredients didn’t exist: they were extinct. Local growers did not produce them and would not be persuaded to try. In particular, grains of the era like Carolina Gold rice, lynchpin of the Antebellum cuisine of South Carolina, were nearly impossible to source.

Glenn’s career epiphany came on a hot summer afternoon in the kitchen of an historic Charleston property. An elaborate rice dinner was just hours away, and the solitary source on earth for Carolina Gold rice at that time—a grower in Savannah—had delivered his product earlier in the day. When the chef opened the bag to cook the rice, the grains were writhing with weevils. Picking through the rice was laborious and time was of the essence. At 7 o’clock in the evening, Glenn found himself at a prep table with two dishwashers, sweating in his suit and tie, and rousting weevils from Carolina Gold, the dinner swirling by without him. He thought of his mother’s cooking when he was a boy. He looked at the lousy rice. He vowed to put Carolina Gold into serious production so this would never happen again.

For the next several years, between projects, Glenn grew small-plot Carolina Gold in Charleston and worked with a rice geneticist in Texas to reinvigorate the seed, which, through neglect and inactivity, had begun to display characteristics of its sister rice, Carolina White. To support his experiments in Carolina Gold, whose resurrection now represented for Glenn an all-consuming preoccupation (his mother, after all, was Geechee, a person who eats rice every day), he began to research other regional heirloom grains of the era that he could throw into production more quickly.

The research began with corn. In 1995, Glenn explored rural back roads looking for the famous white Carolina mill corn that was revered in Antebellum plantation inventories and recipes for its high mineral and floral characteristics and its creamy mouthfeel. He found this corn in a bootlegger’s field near Dillon, South Carolina in 1997, and planted and harvested his own first crop of 30 acres in 1998. Known as Carolina Gourdseed White, the single-family hand-select dated back to the late 1600s.

Glenn passed the Gourdseed grits around to chefs in Charleston and Atlanta, and they all went crazy.

The discovery of Carolina Gourdseed White, and of other nearly extinct varieties of Southern mill corn, fueled Glenn’s efforts to preserve nutrition and flavor in heirloom corn. But he knew the corn would have to be milled as carefully as it was grown.

Returning to historic documents, Glenn read about an heirloom that had been bred to blow down in late fall for hand harvest under snow in deep winter. The corn, an 1850 yellow dent of Appalachian provenance called John Haulk, was known to have made the “finest cornbread and mush.” The fact that it was milled under freezing conditions after full field ripening and drying puzzled Glenn until he froze and milled his own Gourdseed White. The flavors of the cold-milled corn were stunning. With this experiment, Glenn “rediscovered” cold milling and, in so doing, found a way to offset the heat damage grains experience between two stones. He also found a perfect place to store his seed corn: in the freezer.

At this point Glenn possessed a fully realized, madly ambitious plan: to make Carolina Gold rice a viable Southern crop, and to grow, harvest, and mill other nearly extinct varieties of heirloom corn and wheat organically. By doing this, Glenn hoped to re-create ingredients of the Antebellum Southern larder, ingredients that had vanished over time. Grits, cornmeal, Carolina Gold rice, graham and biscuit flour—these ingredients, all milled fresh daily for the table, had helped create a celebrated regional cuisine and America’s first cuisine: the Carolina Rice Kitchen.

Never one for half measures, Glenn, in 1998, sold his worldly possessions, tossed his business cards, and began living out of his car. He rented a sprawling metal warehouse behind a car wash in Columbia, South Carolina and bought four native granite stone mills. Anson Mills was born.

By 2000, Glenn had his first real harvest of Carolina Gold rice, as well as 10 varieties of heirloom Southern dent corns. He was milling grits for chefs in Georgia and the Carolinas. Word got around. A handful of ingredient-conscious chefs across the country began to use Anson Mills products and promote them vigorously to their colleagues. The circle widened.

In 2001, sustained by the success of Anson Mills’ early efforts, Glenn was able to take on full production of certified organic Carolina Gold rice and a “Thirteen Colony” wheat called Red May.

In 2004, Glenn found a complementary match for his drive and detail awareness in the diminutive personage of Kay Rentschler, a former chef and then freelance journalist for the New York Times dining section, as well other New York publications. On assignment for the Times to report on Glenn’s grits, Kay asked more questions and pursued the acquisition of information like few others he had known. Her Times article on Anson Mills, “A Grits Revival with the Flavor of the Old South,” brought such attention to the company that Glenn promptly fell in love. He married Kay, but could not keep her in the South. He’s not complaining: you can’t have everything.

Today, in addition to its collection of native heirloom grains, Anson Mills grows Japanese buckwheat, French oats and Mediterranean wheat, and Italian farro. Kay creates period-authentic recipes, catalogues the history and virtues of the ingredients and dishes alike, and is the photographer for ansonmills.com.

Glenn continues to be restless and deeply curious. He works tirelessly to manage his old grains, the land, and their growers, as well as chefs and retail customers. It’s a relentless effort. But only rarely must he wear a suit.

We also have tender bellly bacon and breakfast sausage and other heritage pork products

Entrepreneurial fires burned in both Erik and Shannon, along with a broad set of professional skills and most importantly, a love for good, pure, clean food and making the simple things extraordinary.

In 2010 they joined forces and started Tender Belly. An immediate hit, the lure of TASTY BACON and other outstanding PORK PRODUCTS was too good for chefs to pass up.

Now Erik and Shannon would like to offer a taste of Tender Belly to individuals like you, OUR FELLOW PORK LOVERS. we understand that anything good takes time and commitment. FINE PORK can only make its way to your table after the utmost care and devotion to the well-being of the animal. The animals live a stress-free life with plenty of open space to roam and exercise. This freedom promotes exquisite intramuscular marbling you can’t achieve any other way.

We also understand that the choice of diet influences the taste of what ends up on your plate; that is why they’re fed an all-natural 100% vegetarian diet.

Dedication to all these aspects is why TENDER BELLY PORK PRODUCTS are the finest and most mouthwatering on the market.

 

Posted in This week at the Ranch | Comments (0)

Vista Verde Ranch, Colorado Luxury Ranch

Horse & Rider Magazine – June 2014

Date: June 3rd, 2014

By Steph

This is a fun story, although let’s be clear that I am not the ranch owner…. 

Horse & Rider Vista Verde Ranch

Posted in Vista Verde in the News | Comments (0)